Videos

More Acoustic Quarantainment: “Too Little Too Late (I Promise)” by The New Limits

I first wrote this song four years ago. It wasn’t meant as an apology, that ship had already sailed. That’s why the song is called ‘Too Little Too Late.’ This was about me publicly recommitting to something; about holding myself and other privileged folks accountable. At the time, in November 2016, it was also about processing my own thoughts. So much of my songwriting could be summed up as publicly sharing conversations I have with myself. Now, in revisiting the song, I think the message—that conversation I was having with myself four years ago—is just as relevant. The work of making this country a better place for every one of its inhabitants—specifically those who have been harmed by it—goes on.

War on Women - Glass City - Youtube Screenshot

Glass Ceiling? Try Glass City

The term “Glass Ceiling” is too limiting. The idea that women can’t get promoted past particular positions or roles in the workforce makes the issue sound confined. You might say “at least there’s only problems in the work place” or “at least that’s the only problem in the work place.” You’d be wrong to say that. That’s not how systemic sexism works. Everything is connected. The work force is connected to an unfair ecosystem and a system that’s stacked up against women.

As we steadily fight against that system, it’s important to get angry. Women have a right to be pissed off and a right to rage. Kathleen Hanna and Bikini Kill called for “girls to the front” at punk shows. So how about “Girls to the top” in the workforce? (more…)

A National Moment of Silence vs Performing Music with my Band

On the evening of August 14th, I was playing a gig at The Middle East Downstairs club in Cambridge, MA. As per usual, I was in a pretty selfish mode. I was rushing from work, to home, to the gig, where I was going to perform for friends and concert-goers. At some point that afternoon, my partner texted me to ask if during our set I could acknowledge the gathering happening that same evening on the Boston Common. Hundreds of people assembled to honor a national moment of silence, recognizing the murder of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, MO. I had heard rumblings that something would be happening, but I wasn’t quite sure what or where. It was easy enough to quickly check my facts before I made remarks on stage that night during our set. Mostly, I just felt embarrassed. I was embarrassed because I was unaware of actions happening in my own community, and I was embarrassed that in light of these tragic events–and a situation that has only gotten worse–I was hanging out at a music venue. (more…)